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Arugula

Updated: Jul 28, 2020


Arugula is a member of the Brassica, or Cruciferous family of vegetables, which includes Brussels sprouts, kale, cauliflower, and broccoli.

It has a distinctive peppery taste that originated in the Mediterranean region. The spicy flavor becomes more bitter with age. A more pungent version is called ‘wild arugula,’ while another version is ‘baby arugula’ which means the plant has been harvested early.



Nutritional profile:

Arugula is high in fiber and phytochemicals. It is high in many vitamins and minerals: calcium, potassium, folate, vitamin C, vitamin K and vitamin A.



Health Benefits:

  • Cancer prevention and anti-cancer activities: Through anti-oxidants, sulforaphane and erucin.

  • Bone health: through vitamin K

  • May improve heart health: through the rich supply of potassium

  • May improve eye health: from the carotenoids beta- carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin.



Preparation and Storage:

Look for greens that aren’t wilted or spotted in color. Since it tends to be a delicate vegetable, try consuming it within a few days of buying it.

After buying this vegetable, wrap the leaves up inside a damp paper towel and store in the refrigerator.

Arugula can be used just like other lettuces and herbs. It can be mixed with other leafy greens in a salad, soup or sauce. It tastes great whether raw or cooked.



Health Concerns:

For people taking blood thinners, too much vitamin K can be harmful. Due to the abundant supply of vitamin K in arugula, discuss eating this vegetable with your physician beforehand.



Recipe Suggestion:

This is a super easy and yummy pesto using arugula rather than the traditional basil,

Arugula pesto with walnuts from the Kitchengirl.com.

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